Trans-Figure

Mark 9:2-10

Many Christians observe what is called Transfiguration Sunday, just before Ash Wednesday. Transfiguration is not a word we say a lot. It comes from the Greek word for metemorphothe, what we pronounce “metamorphosis.” Ongoing change. Of course, maybe you’ve heard or used the word transfiguration as it pertains to the spells of the Harry Potter series. After all, Transfiguration is the family of magical spells that are used for changing objects from one type of thing into another…

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[So says Hermione anyway]. At Hogwarts School, Transfiguration is taught by Professor Minerva McGonagall who also transfigures herself into Violet Crawley on Downton Abbey.

Image result for minerva mcgonagall and violet crawley

So transfiguration has make its way into popular culture. But let’s rewind a bit [a few thousand years] to a couple of old stories that present us with the theme of transfiguration. The Transfiguration story of the NT Gospels is a parallel story to the Jewish story of Moses starting in Exodus 24. In both stories, there is a pivotal moment, set on a mountain. In both stories human nature meets up with the Divine. And in both stories, the main characters [Moses and Jesus] are changed by that experience. And the others who know them are confused, scared, and even skeptical about the change they now see.

The mistake that many make with these two stories is to assume that both Moses and Jesus were godly prophets/leaders chosen by God, and so transfiguration is limited to such rare people who come about once in a lifetime. It’s been said far too often that transfiguration changed both Moses and Jesus into God, and therefore, obviously such an experience is not accessible to everyday people like you and me. But let’s beg to differ. Let’s try our best to not reach like the skeptical, scared, close-minded disciples of Jesus and the followers of Moses. What if transfiguration is not some pie-in-the-sky concept, but a tangible experience for every person? What if you can be transfigured too?

What if you are right now?

See, the concept of the Transfiguration was a preview and an anticipation of the Resurrection. In Moses’ case, he was transfigured and then was able to act as connector between the Israelites and Yahweh. Their covenant was resurrected, and they began their journey together towards Jerusalem. In Jesus’ case, the transfiguration woke up the disciples to a new reality—that God was not stuck on some mountain or in the heavens. And that people who felt like they were dead could actually rise again to life.

Let’s pause and take one more look at the first part of the word:

Transfigure.

What does it mean?

Transfigure : A complete change of form or appearance into a more beautiful or spiritual state.

Go figure. Or, well—TRANS-figure!

Where are you seeing changes of form and appearance into more beautiful and spiritual states?

As for me, in conversations I’ve had with friends and colleagues who identify as LGBT, some of them say that their “coming out” to family and friends was akin to a transfiguration experience.  Disclosure of one’s own sexual orientation and/or true gender identity to loved ones is a big revelation.  Of course, it can be really difficult too, depending on their family member’s and friends’ reaction. But coming out doesn’t change the actual individual, as my friends say, but rather how others perceive and relate to them. I don’t think it’s a stretch to see threads of “coming out” in Jesus’ transfiguration story. I mean, he was surrounded by his close friends/followers, and when Jesus did transfigure those close friends struggled with the change. There was confusion and mistrust.  They had lots of questions. But in the end, when they were able to accept and embrace Jesus’ transfiguration, they changed too.

Others of you can transfigure/are transfiguring. You are waking up in your own way to the possibilities of changing your own form into a more beautiful and spiritual state. You are seeking justice for those without it; you are spending hours and energy working for the health and safety of others without expecting anything in return; you are embracing yourself as you are and learning to live with your mistakes; you are discovering that God is so much bigger than any religion, church, or book; you are befriending people who are different than you and finding shared values; you are transfiguring.

Friends, what if we are on this planet to be agents of transfiguration?

I wish for you moments and an ongoing lifestyle of transfiguring. May we transfigure situations of injustice in justice, love into hate, indifference into compassion. May we accept and embrace anyone who is transfiguring.

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Josh grew up in Indiana and Iowa before completing a Masters of Divinity [M.Div.] at Princeton Theological Seminary [NJ]. He has worked in a variety of settings, including the Presbyterian Church (USA) and United Church of Christ (UCC) in Philadelphia, Hawai’i, Mexico, and Michigan. Currently, he serves as pastor of Love in Action United Church of Christ, a progressive, Christian, LGBTQIA+ affirming and interfaith community in Hatboro, a suburb of Philadelphia. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts in Theatre/Speech from Northwestern College (IA). Josh has worked with youth and young adult programs for 25 years regionally, nationally, and in Latin America. He is also a trained actor and performs regularly with the dinner theatre company, Without a Cue Productions, LLC. He has developed theatre arts curriculum for use in worship, youth groups, education, and group-building. Josh is also committed to promoting religious pluralism and partnering with people of all faiths and those who identify as atheist or agnostic to build bridges of shared values and cooperation. He is honored to work with the Interfaith Center of Greater Philadelphia as a Fellow and a Consultant. Focus areas include: University alternative spring break and summer programs that incorporate faith encounters and service-learning for students; workplace diversity programs that promote understanding in organizations, corporations, schools, and hospital settings. Josh also enjoys playing basketball, strumming on the guitar, traveling, learning language, or making strange and funny faces. He lives in Center City Philadelphia and thinks vegan cheesesteaks are amazingly good.

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