Love: the Wildcard

I Corinthians 13

Love is patient, love is kind…

Image result for same sex weddingYou’ve probably heard this text before. Weddings? Yeah.
Not gonna lie—it’s a bit overused. And misused. So let’s discuss, no?

I Corinthians is Paul of Tarsus’ first letter to a faith community in Corinth. Is it relevant? That depends on how deep you’re willing to go. Context is everything. The writer of this letter, Paul, wasn’t happy at all with this church in Corinth. People were too proud. They thought they had theology and God all figured out. They put down others who didn’t believe or think or act like them. They were full of themselves and therefore had no room left for love. Paul’s focus was indeed on community—not just in this letter, but throughout his life and writings. This is the same guy who described the faith community [or church] as being like the human body. Each part, big or small, was of equal importance. And each body part needed the other in order to function and thrive. Everyone in the community, taught Paul, was equal.[1]

But being “one” had nothing to do with sameness.

The people in the various house churches of the 1st and 2nd century Mediterranean world were incredibly diverse. They were Jews and non-Jews; Greeks and Romans and Israelites and Egyptians and Assyrians and Samaritans; they were people who believed in many gods and others who believed in one; they were women and men who ate different foods, wore different clothes, spoke different languages, said different prayers, and had different ideas. So being community for these people was not about being homogeneous or comfortable.

It was a radical community, like the one Jesus of Nazareth created and lifted up. Jesus met people face to face and accepted them for who they were. He then encouraged his disciples to do the same, to bring this message of God’s kin-dom community to their neighbors near and far. It became the recognizable mark of the Jesus Way. People noticed, because it was weird to accept people who were poor, widowed, childless, unclean, or of low status. It was odd to reach across boundaries of social level and religion. Such an idea and a community would upset the order and status that religious and political leaders wanted to protect.

Paul was into this new way in spite of the odds. He himself used to be one of those oppressors, remember. He was changed by a forgiveness he had never experienced before. Paul was convinced that such a community had the power to make a difference–not just in the lives of individuals–but in the world.

Therefore, this “wedding” text is not about romantic love at all, but a radical, communal love that enables individuals to imagine life in a community where unity and difference can co-exist.[2]

But is this still relevant?

Image result for is this relevant
I think so. Because I sat through a long city council meeting in Hatboro, PA recently on a  Monday night, anticipating a vote on a Human Rights Ordinance that included protections for LGBTQIA people. I spoke, as well as many others, in favor of this ordinance—how it was a no-brainer, common sense, an illustration of what the U.S is supposed to be about. Friends, the only opposition, and I mean the ONLY ONES WHO OPENLY AND VEHEMENTLY OPPOSED THIS ORDINANCE were so-called Christians. They got up and quoted Bible passages without stopping. They went on and on about how their children will be afraid if this passes, how their rights will be infringed, how this was a step in a terrible direction for the town and for the country. They even had the gall to quote scripture passages that talk about loving God and neighbor. Then they turned, in the same breath, to face all of us allies and LGBTQIA folks to say that we were dead wrong, that this ordinance was dangerous, that my friends and colleagues who identify as LGBTQIA are contrary to God’s wishes and contrary to Jesus.

They were the only ones who openly opposed this ordinance. And they used God and Jesus and even Love to justify it.

It passed, by the way. Barely. READ HERE

So I’m gonna keep it simple. I don’t care if you’re religious or not, I really don’t. If you are on the side of love, of human rights, of human dignity, of helping the marginalized whoever they may be—I love you, I’m with you, and I’ll stand with you. Period.

If you’re not—if you choose to hate, regardless of what things you quote or how much you pray or say the name Jesus—you do not know God, you do not know love. Why?

Because love is the wildcard in this messed up world.

We as human beings hurt each other all the time and do so for asinine reasons and out of fear. But love is the wildcard. Love is the unshakable, rust-proof, honest, litmus test. Love unifies those who choose to love. That is relevant in any age or context.

Image result for love wins

[1] He reiterated this in his letter to the Galatians, when he said: There is no longer Jew or Greek, there is no longer slave or free, there is no longer male and female; for all of you are one in Christ Jesus.

[2] Karoline Lewis, Ass. Professor of Preaching, Alvin N. Rogness Chair of Homiletics, Luther Seminary.

Posted by

Josh grew up in Indiana and Iowa before completing a Masters of Divinity [M.Div.] at Princeton Theological Seminary [NJ]. He has worked in a variety of settings, including the Presbyterian Church (USA) and United Church of Christ (UCC) in Philadelphia, Hawai’i, Mexico, and Michigan. Currently, he serves as pastor of Love in Action United Church of Christ, a progressive, Christian, LGBTQIA+ affirming and interfaith community in Hatboro, a suburb of Philadelphia. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts in Theatre/Speech from Northwestern College (IA). Josh has worked with youth and young adult programs for 25 years regionally, nationally, and in Latin America. He is also a trained actor and performs regularly with the dinner theatre company, Without a Cue Productions, LLC. He has developed theatre arts curriculum for use in worship, youth groups, education, and group-building. Josh is also committed to promoting religious pluralism and partnering with people of all faiths and those who identify as atheist or agnostic to build bridges of shared values and cooperation. He is honored to work with the Interfaith Center of Greater Philadelphia as a Fellow and a Consultant. Focus areas include: University alternative spring break and summer programs that incorporate faith encounters and service-learning for students; workplace diversity programs that promote understanding in organizations, corporations, schools, and hospital settings. Josh also enjoys playing basketball, strumming on the guitar, traveling, learning language, or making strange and funny faces. He lives in Center City Philadelphia and thinks vegan cheesesteaks are amazingly good.

Leave a Reply